Told Eva about the magazine.

Jul. 26th, 2017 02:16 am
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
"You should've gotten a subscription to Cricket."

"We already get a subscription to Cricket."

"So? N doesn't."

"N practically lives here. She doesn't need her own subscription."

"Don't you want her to read more!?"

(Okay, she didn't say that last line, but she thought it VERY LOUDLY.)
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
I happened to be standing next to a pair of adolescents. First the girl remarked that she couldn't believe she'd lived on the Island 16 years and never taken the Ferry (I couldn't believe it either!) and then her friend, clearly trying to impress her with his experience, found himself in a loop, repeating "It can take them a long time to get off" at least three times. (It CAN take them a long time to get off the boat! There's always somebody who thinks the announcement to disembark wasn't actually directed at them). But I don't think she noticed, so that's all right :)

I hope they had fun! The boat is really the most affordable date in town, and certainly fun if you don't take it every day.

***************


10 Relics From the Horse-Powered City Hiding in Plain Sight

The Man Who Blew The Door Off The Microbial World

The Rivers of the U.S., Collected Into a Nifty Subway Map

Spiral arms allow school children to weigh black holes

The entrepreneur who asked Stephen King for a blurb and got a book instead

Scientists Reverse Brain Damage in Drowned U.S Toddler Eden Carlson

Heinz Develops ‘Chicago Dog Sauce’ for the City That Won’t Put Ketchup on Its Hot Dogs (LOL)

The Clay Models Used to Analyze Entrails in the Ancient World

10 Ridiculous Feats of Literature (The story about Hemingway's short story is silly. I guess we're supposed to think the baby died, but c'mon, it's a baby. They outgrow clothes all the time, especially shoes. If the parents had been saving that pair for a special occasion, that occasion never came, is all. And "baby outgrew clothes" isn't a story, it's a piece of advice - don't save the dress up clothes for dressy occasions!)

Not in This Day and Age? On “Feisty, Cheeky, and Rebellious” Women in History

Utah home-birth rate is double the US average, report says

Why Hospitals Started Displaying Newborn Babies Through Windows

Curiosity is underemphasized in the classroom, but research shows that it is one of the strongest markers of academic success.

Child living with HIV maintains remission without drugs since 2008

Magic Can Be Normal

Where Are All the Black Boys in Middle Grade Fiction? A 2017 Assessment and Comparison

Is It A Good Idea To Pay Villagers Not To Chop Down Trees?

Can Tennis Offer a Means of Social Mobility in India?

Why Canada Is Able to Do Things Better

12 Ways Airports Are Secretly Manipulating You ("Last year, the TSA announced it would give $15,000 to the person who comes up with the best idea for speeding up security." I have an idea - quit with the pointless security theater, and let us keep our shoes on! I'll be collecting my $15k now, please. Kindly send it in the form of $2 bills, thanks.)

The Un-Pretty History Of Georgia's Iconic Peach

What's the Matter With Little Free Food Pantries?

Beijing’s Balkan backdoor

South Park raised a generation of trolls

The Commodification of Orthodox Judaism

Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To?

Rape Choreography Makes Films Safer, But Still Takes a Toll on Cast and Crew

The Good Guy with a Gun Theory, Debunked

The new astrology

Senate advances on healthcare, with dramatic return by McCain (Fuck you, McCain, you and the rest of them.)

Why an Effort to Thwart Some Boycotts of Israel Fails the Free-Speech Test

The Pentagon’s handling of munitions and their waste has poisoned millions of acres, and left Americans to guess at the threat to their health.

July 25--Udon

Jul. 25th, 2017 10:37 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
The last time I was driving through the little rural town southeast of us that I love, I noticed that there was a new restaurant. A sushi restaurant. It seemed kind of unlikely that someone would open a sushi restaurant in what is primarily a farming town, but I guess there are a lot of non-farmer people living out that way now. Not to say that farmers don't like sushi.

Anyway, we tried it today for lunch. I don't eat sushi, but there is always stuff that I like to eat. I had a bento box with teriyaki beef. Malida had the sushi. It was quite good, and the restaurant was doing a good business.

dragon

I fooled around with the drip irrigation system this afternoon and extended it to the patio so my lime tree would get some water while we are gone. This evening it sprung a bunch of leaks, so I will have to take another look at it tomorrow. I used a section of old tubing, which I think is the problem.

I have a big crack in my windshield. Not sure what happened, but it is now extended about halfway across. I called the insurance company, and they told me they had a place that could fix it for about $400, which was $100 less than my deductible. Their first appointment was next week, in a shop that's about an hour away from me. I called around and found a place with a great reputation in the community, that will come to my house to fix it, this Thursday, for about $150 less. Easy decision.

I have to go in to work for a few hours and finish up my IV curriculum project. I don't really feel like going in, but it has to get done. I have too much else going when I get back from vacation to put it off.

I'm not ready for it to be fall yet.

Wooden O redux

Jul. 26th, 2017 12:35 am
nineweaving: (Default)
[personal profile] nineweaving
              Screen shot 2016-06-21 at 5.04.59 AM.pngScreen shot 2016-06-21 at 5.05.16 AM.png


Jamie Parker, who sat on the panel that chose Michelle Terry to lead Shakespeare's Globe, describes her as a "genuine collaborator, who at the same time won't sacrifice the courage of her artistic convictions. ... No one can possibly accuse Michelle of being a regressive traditionalist, or backwards-looking. Her work speaks for itself. That said, she is also in-tune with the building as a theatrical instrument and she has her own understanding of the imaginative contract between the actors and the audience. That is the bedrock of everything that happens on Bankside."

"Theatrical instrument" is well said. If you've been in the Globe, it resonates like a drum: its players speak high and clear, like pipe and tabor, sackbut and shawm. And hearing a play in the Wanamaker is like sitting inside a lute.

It's sad that that commentators keep apologizing, as if a love of Shakespeare were reactionary.

Michelle Terry says: "The work of Shakespeare is for me timeless, mythic, mysterious, vital, profoundly human and unapologetically theatrical. There are no other theatres more perfectly suited to house these plays than the pure and uniquely democratic spaces of The Globe and the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. I am so proud and excited that I will be in the privileged position where I can offer artists the opportunity to come together to reclaim and rediscover not only Shakespeare, but the work of his contemporaries, alongside new work from our current writers. For us to then share those stories with an audience that demands an unparalleled honesty, clarity and bravery, is all a dream come true."

Amen.

Nine

sovay: (Sovay: David Owen)
[personal profile] sovay
So, yes, we got home tonight and saw that John McCain waited to take life-saving advantage of the ACA before he voted, along with fifty other Republican senators whose careers I hope will be even shorter-lived than it seems they want their constituents to be, to proceed with killing it and quite a lot of other people. These are highlights of the day I had before that.

1. [personal profile] spatch met me after my doctor's appointment this afternoon; we walked up the Esplanade to Back Bay (willows, cormorants, a blue reflected hollow in the overcast rippling in the river's wind-waves; I climbed a tree and developed a hole in my sock) and had dinner at the Cornish Pasty Co., where the chicken tikka masala pasty was approximately half the size of a human head and the toffee pudding with crème anglais arrived in a crucible. These are both endorsements. We had not planned on a book-gathering trip, but first there were the book sale carts at the West End Branch of the BPL and then there was Rodney's. I now appear to own Jack Weatherford's The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire (2010), Jean Potts' Home Is the Prisoner (1960), Derek Jarman: A Portrait (1996) edited by Roger Wollen, and Cicely Mary Barker's The Lord of the Rushie River (1938), which I freely admit I bought because "Traveller's Joy" appears in the text as a folk song. The clouds had broken up by the time we were walking back over the Harvard Bridge and the Charles was full of white and pink sails, including a small flotilla circling one another and then crocodiling back to the MIT boathouse. Rob took a couple of pictures of me on the Esplanade. I am not all right with photographs of myself right now, so I am trying to make a point of them.

And the gunner we had was apparently mad. )

2. [personal profile] yhlee and [personal profile] telophase have developed a hexarchate Tarot. Specifically, a jeng-zai deck of the era of Machineries of Empire. You can ask it things. There are no illustrations as yet, but I ran two spreads from different factions and even allowing for the pattern-making capacity of the human brain it gave me scarily decent readings both times. Fair warning: it comes from a dystopia. I'm not sure it knows how to advise on light matters.

3. Courtesy of Michael Matheson: from the archives of Robot Hugs, Gender Rolls. I'm not sure why we don't seem to own any dice, but fortunately the internet provides. I got non-binary femme-type dandy. I . . . can really live with that, actually.

We bought food for the cats. We bought ice cream for ourselves. I guess tomorrow I make a lot more calls.

contemplating shipwreck

Jul. 25th, 2017 11:35 pm
marycatelli: (Default)
[personal profile] marycatelli
There's a shipwreck.  With my heroine and her companions on the ship.

Now, is it just before the story opens, or does it open the story?
Read more... )
yhlee: Drop Ships from Race for the Galaxy (RTFG)
[personal profile] yhlee
"All the Colors You Thought Were Kings" by Arkady Martine [Shimmer]. Heart-stoppingly gorgeous space opera, stars as sharp as knives. I wish I wrote half so well.

This was exactly what I needed to read tonight.

Tomorrow there’ll be ceremonies and presentations, and then your nanite horde will be calibrated for shipside on live broadcast for the entire Fleet to see – another cohort of kids full up with starshine micromechanics, bound to service and obedience, gone off into the stars. You’ve been dreaming about it since you could read. You want it so much you’ve spent the last three months feeling like your chest is going to burn out from longing.

The night after tomorrow, though. You can’t let yourself dream about that.

Under the drape of your overjacket, snugged up to your spine like you’re its best lovecrush, are the disassembled pieces of a sniper rifle. Nestled right at the small of your back is the lead-shielded explosive heart of an electromagnetic pulse bomb.

Well, I'm back

Jul. 25th, 2017 09:34 pm
osprey_archer: (cheers)
[personal profile] osprey_archer
Aaaaaaand home! Google maps said the drive from DC would take nine hours, so of course it took about twelve (Google maps also thinks it is possible to walk from DC to Indianapolis in eight days. Maybe if you are a solar-powered automaton who needs neither food nor sleep, and has anyone looked into whether Google is constructing these potential robot overlords?) but I made it and I have unpacked my things and put them away, except for my new books, for which I will need to find homes.

I did not intend to get this many new books. They crept up on me. Where else would I find a memoir about growing up in the Oneida Community? How could I possibly turn down a picture book about Emily Dickinson illustrated by Barbara Cooney, one of my very favorite illustrators ever? And of course there was The Railway Children just waiting for me in a Little Free Library...

But I think now that I have finished reading it, I ought to pass it on through another Little Free Library, so I don't need to tidy that one away, at least.

The garden is looking - well, honestly, the garden looks as if the tomatoes are planning an assault on the house; they have taken over everything, choking out the dill and overshadowing the poor lovely snapdragons. The basil, which is in a pot and thus safe from the tomato plants' depredations, looks sad and pallid, and probably needs a bigger pot and probably some compost, poor thing.

The rosemary, also in a pot, looks good, and I should get a rotisserie chicken and make chicken salad and have a picnic. On my travels I recollected how much I enjoy picnics, and also how much I used to enjoy taking day trips to whatever sites of interest there are in the area - I did this a lot in Minnesota - so clearly I ought to pack some picnics and drag my friends along for some sight-seeing.

I have gone through my mail and paid the bills and tidied away the bank statements and set my letters aside for future perusal ([personal profile] asakiyume, your letter arrived all right!). I will attempt to read them at a rate of one per night to spread the joy, although it will be hard not to read them all in one swift gulp. It's such a treat to have so many letters!

Must make a grocery list, but that can wait until tomorrow.

I did not get quite as much writing done as I hoped (but then one never does on a trip), but I have made some pretty good progress revising Sage, (still haven't figured out a title for it, though), although part of this progress has involved deciding I need to rewrite the first 10,000 words or so... so there's still quite a bit to be done.

Well, I wasn't expecting that!

Jul. 25th, 2017 04:49 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
I just won a free one-year subscription to a magazine put out by Cricket! We already get Cricket, so I went with Muse. Fingers crossed that the girls like it.
ravens_quill: (Loki)
[personal profile] ravens_quill
My dad is from the South. He grew up in Mississippi, but his mother is from Louisiana (the Wards), and he has family in Oklahoma and Kansas as well, if I recall correctly.

For a long time, my siblings and I didn't really get to hear any stories from his side of the family. We heard about the olive tree, and eating bread and onions, the grand-uncle (great-uncle?) with the castle now in ruins, the ghost with an ax in its head, and the snake in the middle of the forest path--all stories from my mother, from when she was a child living in Italy. But we never got much from my dad. For a long time, there was a rift with his side of the family.

But time changes most things, and in this case, opened up the lines of communication between him and his siblings. And he started to tell stories, about his mutt named Scraps, and visiting grandparents with a tin roof and an outhouse, why he hates all the Southern food my mother loves.

The thing is, even though there were many years he didn't tell stories, you could still learn a few things about him. He was a Southerner and he spent a lifetime in the army.

One time, he took my siblings and I to a fast food restaurant for dinner, and as we ate, he was telling us something. To be honest, I don't even know if it was a story or just a recounting of some bit of his day. I was younger, maybe not totally paying attention, until he said, "far gone."

At least, that was what I heard, and then it was all I could hear. What was the context? That makes no sense? Did I miss something? Had he said something else that just sounded like that? But then, what could it be? The rest of the details faded as I thought about that drawl which seemed to blend the words together. His Southern drawl had long been a thing wrangled into submission by years in the army--much like my mother, he'd had to learn "proper English" so he could communicate with people from other places--we knew he was from the South, but it rarely made itself so obvious.

To be honest, I don't know how long it took me to figure it out. That it wasn't just the drawl but the words themselves that were unfamiliar. He'd actually said, "fire guard." Like a firefighter. But eventually I figured it out, and I liked the turn of phrase, and it remained a tiny reminder of where my dad came from.

***

Now, I mentioned the army, something for which he felt he had to minimize the way he spoke. But it too added to his lexicon. My older sister and I were in the car with him once, a few years ago.

He was telling us about something, probably work. Complaining about someone who should have known what they were doing and who very much did not. And he ended the description with a soft but fervent, "What the fuck? Over."  [Ooo, deja vu.]

He always said it like it was one whole phrase, though. "Whatthefuck, over." Only the barest pause before the "over."

I'd heard it before, a few times, but never understood why he did it.

After this occasion, when my sister and I were alone, she asked if I had noticed it. I said yes. She loved it as a verbal quirk of our dad, and said she never wanted to tell him. She thought if he realized he did it, he'd become self-conscious and stop doing it, and she never wanted him to stop.

It was something he picked up from the army, speaking over walkie-talkies. And it stayed. He retired from the military over twenty years ago now, but he still says "over," and even more rarely, throws in a "roger."

It's delightful to experience, and feels like hearing a secret.

I never mention it to him, because I don't want him to start feeling self-conscious and stop.


I noticed something in that trip that I'd noticed before, and when she and I talked about it later, she said she never wanted to
jimhines: (Snoopy Writing)
[personal profile] jimhines

By now, I imagine most of my fellow geeks are aware that when Peter Capaldi leaves Doctor Who in the coming Christmas special, he’ll be replaced by Jodie Whittaker. Naturally, not everyone was happy about the next Doctor being…gasp…a woman.

As the conversation progressed, I started to see more people suggesting the backlash wasn’t a thing. All they were seeing was people complaining about the backlash, as opposed to anyone actually being unhappy about a woman playing the Doctor. The whole thing was people getting angry over nothing, and feeding on each other’s anger.

Now Steven Moffat himself has joined in to proclaim, “There has been so many press articles about a backlash among the Doctor Who fandom about casting a female Doctor. There has been no backlash at all. The story of the moment is that the notionally conservative Doctor Who fandom has utterly embraced that change completely.”

Oddly, most of the people I’ve seen saying the backlash is imaginary, made-up, and/or blown completely out of proportion, have been men. Perhaps — and I’m just guessing here — because it’s easier for men to overlook sexism? Misogyny doesn’t directly affect us, so we’re less likely to notice it?

It’s like white people denying racism, straight people denying the hatred and intolerance of homosexuality, and so on. Just because we don’t see it — perhaps because we choose not to look, or perhaps because we’ve never learned to look — doesn’t mean it isn’t real.

For all those who share Moffat’s confusion, here are just a few examples of the ignorant, sexist, hateful, and sometimes flat-out batshit responses to Whittaker taking over as the Doctor.

#

“The replacement of male with female is meant to erase femininity. In point of fact, and no matter what anyone thinks or wishes, readers and viewers have a different emotional relationship to female characters as male. This does not mean, obviously, that females cannot be protagonists or cannot be leaders. It means mothers cannot be fathers and queens cannot be kings.

“…I have been a fan of Dr Who since age seven, when Tom Baker was the Doctor. I have tolerated years of public service announcements in favor of sexual deviance that pepper the show. But this is too much to tolerate.

“The BBC has finally done what The Master, the Daleks and the Cybermen have failed to do. They killed off the Doctor.”

John C. Wright (you may remember him from his freak-out over Korra and Asami.)

#

Over on Twitter, @TechnicallyRon took comments from angry Doctor Who “fans” and turned them into title cards.

Lisa Crowther also screenshotted some comments from angry Daily Mail readers.

#

Twitter also has plenty of comments like this fellow’s woeful lament, “And again the PC brigade get their way. R.I.P Doctor Who” (Source)

#

Joe Scaramanga’s response to this sexist twit was a thing of beauty.

#

British tabloid and shit-filled dumpster fire The Sun responded to the announcement by publishing nude photos of Judie Whittaker.

#

Caitlynn Fairbarns has rounded up a ton of the negative comments and reactions.

#

But remember everyone, it’s not about sexism!

“It’s a woman. That’s it, Doctor Who is ruined. Like I said, I’m not sexist, I just don’t think it’s a good idea.” –Mark S.W.

#

Now, folks might argue that the majority of Doctor Who fans are excited about the Doctor being a woman. (Though there’s a very real and valid frustration that we’re on our fourteenth doctor and the character has still been exclusively white.) Others will say some of the negative comments are coming from trolls just looking to get a reaction, or that of course Daily Mail readers are being horrid about Whittaker’s casting.

You might be right. That doesn’t change the fact that the negativity exists. It’s not one or two isolated assholes. It’s a real and significant thing, and it’s closely tied to the kind of harassment and disdain and hatred and other forms of sexism women deal with every day. Sexism that men so often don’t see. Sexism we respond to by telling women they’re overreacting, or they’re just imagining things, or that if they’d just stop talking about it the problem would somehow magically go away.

I get it. You’re tired of hearing people complain about sexism. Gosh, can you imagine how tiring it must be when you’re constantly on the receiving end of that sexism. Constantly being told you shouldn’t be allowed to play the same kinds of roles. Constantly being told your only worth comes from your body. Constantly being told your inclusion is some kind of public service announcement. Constantly having your accomplishments belittled as “PC pandering.”

Look, I wish we didn’t have folks like Wright rolling around with his head up his ass every time his Straight White Manliness feels threatened by a cartoon or a TV show or whatever else he’s scared of this week, but we do. Pretending otherwise not only turns a blind eye to the pervasiveness of sexism and other forms of bigotry, it also means turning your back on those who are directly targeted by that intolerance every day.

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

Nonsense

Jul. 25th, 2017 10:41 am
pjthompson: quotes (quotei)
[personal profile] pjthompson

Random quote of the day:

“The danger of civilization, of course, is that you will piss away your life on nonsense.”

—Jim Harrison, The Beast God Forgot to Invent

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Lucy and Ethel, Justin Bieber, or the Kardashian Klan. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Mirrored from Better Than Dead.

An Old Love Story

Jul. 26th, 2017 02:09 am
snakypoet: (Default)
[personal profile] snakypoet
 A friend on facebook wonders, what is the event she’s marked in her diary as ‘My event’ for August 8. I can’t help her. I can’t guess what significance August 8 might have for her. But the date pierces my heart. 

 

I think, ‘No, that’s my event.’ But it’s not even mine. It was his – his birthday. He died eight days before it in 1982. (Gods, can it be so long?) He would have turned 25.

 

When I start to have my ‘anniversary reaction’ during the winter months leading up to the date of my dear husband Andrew’s death, in September 2012 when he was 83, that is not the only anniversary I’m reacting to, not the only death. 

 

My two greatest loves, so far apart in time – how appropriate that it is winter that brings those deaths back for me, with bleak cold. 

 

Then comes the consciousness of being alone. I don’t normally mind that. I keep busy; I like my own company; I’m content. But at this time of year my aloneness confronts me. It becomes loneliness. It becomes an abyss. Do I hear a wolf howling? I shut my ears, make myself busy….

 

a sudden chill

the date of your death

arrives again


In the memoir I’m writing, I’ve been frank, so far, about the men I’ve loved. But not this one. This is the one I never speak of – though I do write poems. 


Very few people know what he meant to me. (Few know anything of him at all.) Those who do were there at the time; they saw it all play out. Some others may have guessed, but if so they have never dared ask. 


 

Really there are only two who understand completely. It has been remarked on between us possibly three or four times in 35 years. The hurt is still deep; and after all, there is nothing useful or even needful to say. We know. We know that we know. That is all. (That is everything.)

 

our eyes meet

he lives in the unsaid

our friend who died

 

There was one other. Just one time we spoke of it. We talked for hours; we said everything. We always knew we would. We’d waited years … and still we needed to get drunk together first. He has long disappeared; no contact for decades, no knowledge for either of where the other might be. It’s probably better so. 

 

Then there was a friend I made much later, who read my selected poems and asked, 'Rosemary, who died, in your life?' (This was long before Andrew died.) So I told her the story, in outline. She could barely grasp it. We have never mentioned it again. That was years ago; I think she has forgotten all about it by now.

 

did we exist

if no-one knows? 

– Zen koan

 

Shall I write the tale at last? What could I say that anyone who didn't live it alongside me could possibly understand? I could relate the facts, but what could they truly convey? 

 

I might tell it one day, but not today.

 

So was he my true love, the love of my life? Oh, all loves are true! And all loves, when true, are for life. Andrew, with whom I had a life, a happy one for 20 years, is the one I most acutely miss. That other, who died before he was 25 – which was shock as well as grief – has been the longest dead.

 

After he died, I wrote: All my years / you’ll go on being dead. They stretched before me interminably, then.

 

All those years ago, I learned everything about intense grief. All these years since, I have come to know that grief never ends, though we learn to live with it. 

 

I would have died to save him, if it could have saved him. I live on. I mourn. I relish life.

 

blue skies

you will never see

winter sun


 

NIF: eps 15-16 Lanterns and Swords

Jul. 25th, 2017 08:57 am
sartorias: Mei Changs (MC)
[personal profile] sartorias
These are transitional scenes in that they flash to the past but are building toward a coming confrontation. But on repeated viewings, we can see deep groundwork being laid for even bigger stakes.

And oh, the emotional moments are riveting.
Read more... )
larryhammer: Enceladus (the moon, not the mythological being), label: "Enceladus is sexy" (astronomy)
[personal profile] larryhammer
When Girls Studied Planets and the Skies Had No Limits. (via)

Redefining the kilogram, using precise measurements of Planck's constant. Note that despite the article's focus on America's NIST measurement, two groups in other countries have made similarly accurate measurements.

Study shows that having more than one illustration per page-spread makes it harder for early readers to learn new words. Key jargon: Cognitive Load Theory. (via)

---L.

Subject quote from "Hope on Fire," Vienna Teng.

Falling down a...

Jul. 25th, 2017 04:37 pm
gale_storm: (Default)
[personal profile] gale_storm
...no, not falling down a rabbit hole. Or even falling to the floor, which I've now not done in, oh, more than a year, I guess. 

At least I've never found myself falling down a rubbish chute. Yeah, not yet, anyhow!

The strangest places where someone can read about the oddest happenings are, well, spots in which I tend to spend too much time. That said, I'll leave you with this story, without spending overmuch time to make it sound like a Twilight Zone episode:

So, lessee... About 3 a.m., a man goes to throw away stuff down a rubbish chute, becomes confused as to whether his phone was in the bag he just tossed away, so he leans in a bit too far and plummets down the chute to find his phone had been in his pocket all along. Still and all, he's now found himself at the bottom of the chute, which I'm envisioning like the ick in 'Star Wars,' as his rescuers pumped air down to him as they worked to get him out, which happened after about an hour after he first fell in. O.O

DC man fell into a trash chute because of his phone


The Machineries of Tarot

Jul. 25th, 2017 08:51 am
yhlee: wax seal (hxx Deuce of Gears)
[personal profile] yhlee
For your amusement, hexarchate Tarot readings (coding and spreads by [personal profile] telophase, card meanings by me):
No art right now, just meanings. The 78-card jeng-zai deck corresponds to the traditional Tarot but is specifically a hexarchate Tarot circa Kel Cheris' era. As such, upright sixes are all positive while upright sevens are negative, and the fours are lucky/unlucky.

This site is for entertainment purposes only: neither guarantees nor apologies are given for the accuracy or inaccuracy of any reading you may receive, and no responsibility is taken for any calendrical rot that may ensue. Hopefully you do not live in the hexarchate.
sovay: (Cho Hakkai: intelligence)
[personal profile] sovay
There is now a Blu-Ray of The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T (1953). And it's region-free.

Well, I'm delighted.

(I have to thank Cine Outsider for the tip-off; I had no idea until I was scrolling down as I do about every month or so and then what? I still have dreams of seeing an actual print someday. The film was shot in Technicolor. It may have been chopped to pieces by Columbia, but what's left should still look good. Besides, I have always had the sneaking suspicion that even the most faithful digital transfer cannot properly reproduce the full effect of Dr. Terwilliker's hat.)

July 24--The Rover

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:53 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
Today I drove to the city of Stockton to take advantage of another Ingress farm that was still up. Much of it was along the Stockton waterfront, where I had not been for many years. Stockton had a rough go of it during the economic downturn, and it still shows. Lots of empty buildings in an area that in any other city would be thriving.

The last time I was in that part of Stockton was in the early 1990s to see a baseball game. There is a minor league stadium near the waterfront. I thoroughly enjoyed that game and always meant to go back, but I never did.

I wandered around for a while and played Ingress. I didn't think to take pictures other than one of what is supposed to be a happy rock, but when I look at it now, it seems to be screaming in terror.

unhappy rock

I stopped at a place I know for lunch on the way back, and it was just about perfect. After I got home I did some chores, and in the evening sat in the back yard as the delta breeze kicked in and cooled off the temperatures.

I am in the thick of my Hardy Boys book. The thing I notice most about the older (and longer) versions, are that the descriptions of the boys' lives are richer. The author spends a couple pages describing their preparations for a camping trip, and the excitement that builds as the trip gets closer. I remember why I liked these books as a kid.

July 2017

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